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. >>> just for josh we have this headline. the miami heat fought back from a 27-point deficit to beat the cleveland cavaliers extending their winning streak to 24 games. they have nine to go before tying -- >> unbelievable -- >> all-time -- you should have been sleeping instead of watching. too good. >> there's history to be seen. >>> finally imagine being 9 years old and having a dinosaur species named after you. well, daisy morris doesn't have to imagine. a few years back she uncovered a fossil on an england beach and scientists eventually concluded it was an unknown species of flying dinosaur and look at the name they have given it, vectidraco daisymorrisae. she is so passionate. one expert said her bedroom looks like a natural history museum with all the fossils. how about that for show and tell. >> robin? >> that's great. >> okay, you two. >>> now to what could be a major breakthrough in the fight against cancer. we're very excited about this. in a clinical trial patients' own immune cells were altered to fight a deadly form of leukemia. one patient is said to be cancer-free afte
for tax revenue to help reduce the deficit. it calls for more spending. we are in the funny process where today, we will wrap up beforehand 50 hours of debate and start the unlimited amendment process. any issue that you have heard complaints about, we might see votes on today. droneld be stuff like strikes against u.s. citizens, it could be taxes and repealing healthcare. the point to remember, this is adding on to a budget resolution. it is interesting and it may give people clues as to what appetites there are in the senate to pass or repeal certain elements of policy. host: the headline says the senate is poised to pass a budget. do you expect it to pass? guest: we do expect it to pass. behink the democrats will able to control the process and get it to pass. they have a small window. you would need vice president biden to come down and break the tie. the significance is, this is the result -- there is a lot of pent up frustration on the republican side. that is why we might see a late night tonight and into the morning. once it is passed, i think a lot of people will feel better and
costs as the school system faces a reported $1 billion deficit. ward constituents have been calling all day. >> some cases we're happy, some not so happy. >> reporter: on the plus side, the savings will allow major investments in surviving schools including adding 70 libraries, science labs and even air-conditioning. for many it's not what's gained but what's lost and where. neighborhood schools in some of chicago's poorest communities. school officials say it was based on low enrollments, but others say race played a role. an alderman told the "chicago tribune," every time the whites get to scheming and hollering, they back off and steam roll. not this time. she's
-income americans to reduce the deficit. so now, finally, senate democrats feel that they can go ahead and echo that position. that's change. >> an narc the president is expected to release the white house budget in april. what kind of compromises, if any, can we expect to see there? >> i think he is going to kind of come up and say the same things that he has been saying. we will look at the changes he will make to the entitlement program. the republicans saying they will not raise tax and what the democrats might do on entitlement reforms if they can find any kind of common ground that would be possible there. >> bill schneider, anna palmer, stick around. we would like to come back to you later in the hour, if that's okay with you. >> sure. >> thanks. >>> could bill clinton be talking out of both sides of his mouth? the report that suggests escorting two candidates for the same office. we will talk about that. >>> first though, kristen cinema is here, very excited about being here. we just had a 15-minute conversation to make up. we can't talk about that. we can talk immigration, marriage equ
-term debt and recovered the budget deficit. detroit is the largest u.s. city ever put under state control. those are your headlines. i am lauren reed. back to connell. connell: a move lower in stocks. we have noticed some of the french banks. they are all down. dagen: a snowstorm that dumped as much as 2 feet in the northwest. connell: i would rather be over in cyprus. >> good morning. we are tracking it again. parts of illinois being hit with as much as 15 inches of snow. it is as far west as parts of indiana. the highest snowfall totals should be a foot of snow. we do have winter storm warnings in effect. it is because of the wind and snowfall amounts. we actually have been seeing some delays. they are about an hour or so. you could see four-6 inches of snow out here. the central appellations and most of these warnings should expire by tomorrow. that is what we think the storm system will pull out of the northeast leaving behind some quieter conditions. connell: that sounds, well, all right. dagen: tom kloza is coming up with a big addiction on gasoline prices. he says you will save mon
to a trillion dollars in new deficit for this year. you know, you look at paul ryan's budget, for example, ten years down the road, 41 1/2 trillion dollars in spending and that was supposed to be a victory, because the democrat's version was 46 1/2 trillion dollars, we're still outspending our means. still a broken system. d.c. really has to figure out how to get a balance, a balanced budget would be a win. stuart: in the short-term if i'm a trader, trading stocks, for example, i think this is a win for republicans and i think this is a win for me as an investor. stocks go uu. you say? >> well, i think you're conflating. and 20 years trading and what i told you last time and the last time and last time, i think that things are getting better in spite of president obama because if we continue to juice the system the way we are, we're adding 85 billion dolllrs to the treasury, ingratiating the banking system. i'll tell you this, ready for this? you have investors out there to watch the show and pick out stocks to buy, just buy u.s. banks. buy u.s. banks. we are giving them so much money. we're g
that deficit with the daily impact. you kind of hurt that a little bit and what the president living in that abc news interview as well. is that a new track for the democrats. >> first, they went too far with the fears of armageddon. the democrats overplayed their hand. on the other hand, it is the case that the ordinary american is in having a better life in their parents. they are worried about reform plans. they are uncertain and they are nervous. dagen: $17 trillion debt, the average american is not having the impact on the lives. >> i am disagreeing. the democrats overplayed their hand with fear. we have tepid economic growth. we are not seeing the revitalization of the economy on main street. connell: regular people -- >> so-called great rotation into stocks from bonds has not really happened to the degree people expected. a lot of ordinary people who were heavily invested in mutual funds have not come back. connell: doug, thank you. dagen: watch out for rising interest rates. that will be pain that everybody feels. speaking of rising interest rates and the housing market and h
. cyprus needed a total bail out of 17 billion euros and they needed to to fund their banks and deficit. they said we will only give you ten and you have to come up with the other seven. it led to runs on atms in cyprus and protests as the president arrived at parliament. here's what they decided to do. they're going to tax bank depos sxits the ox original plan on saturday, 10% if you have an account larger than 100,000 euros and here's what led to the protests, 6.75% if you're under 100,000 euros and that's fdic deposit insurance. market watchers were aghast that insured depositors would be hit, but the insurance was essentially a falsehood. what if citizens in italy or spain begin to think that they being lose their money even if it is supposedly insured? could that lead to bank runs? it is so controversial the cyprus parliament couldn't get it passed yesterday. they say they would do it today. it didn't happen and now they're trying for tomorrow. they are re-working the plan so the smaller guy is not hit so hard, but still, it appears they're going after insured deposits. why did the
down to have our deficit reduced to 3% by 2015 because of the fact of a program of assistance from from the e.u. and the imf. we are now actually ranked number one in the world for skilled labor. economic recovery in itself is never in and of itself in keeping with the democratic ideas as for what recovery can do for the people in terms of the social impact of the contribution they can make to their localities into their country. political will, culture and social and economic and that recovery and all its potential has come following a very hard piece in ireland. we have some experience of this and to contribute validly too many contributions around the world. in fact the president made the point that since the united nations was founded ireland is the one country, the one country small though it is that can validly point to personnel and peacekeepers and in some location around the world on peacekeeping missions and humanitarian missions since the u.n. was actually founded. you are well aware of the troubles in ireland over a 40-year period and how painful that was and how it affected
't even know we had a national debt or deficit. but then a grassroots movement known as the tea party started to emerge. [cheers and applause] and what made the tea party so effective was not only it came from the grassroots, but it had three core values; fiscal responsibility, constitutionally-limited government and free markets. and because of the tea party, we were able to put patriots like michele bachmann, joe walsh into congress so they can make sure that congress will not continue to spend my generation's money. [applause] we need to save the tea party so that we can save america. [applause] ladies and gentlemen, please welcome jenny martin from the tea party patriots. [cheers and applause] ♪ >> thank you. [cheers and applause] picture this: college students in this country who are optimistic about the future and look forward to living the american dream. after college they pursue their careers and begin to make a living. they become parents and put food on the table for their children, save for their retirement and still have money left for leisure activities and vacations.
's what counts. not if you happen to have a little deficit, and in fact michael steele went on to say when we were handing out checks i don't believe reince priebus complaining. >> so reince is just being silly. and i understand he wasn't complaining about debt and concerned about debt when i was write checks to wisconsin when he was chairman and he wanted to win the legislature and governor which they did and they were all on board about going into debt to win. >> when did republicans turn into democrats. it's all overshadowed and sabotaged by infighting. >> bill: this is the circular firing squad for which republicans are famous. grace nap ol 'tano will be with here today, neil king, and of course you'll be with us too throughout the morning, and mike i will bloomberg is on the warpath again. but first. >> announcer: this the "full court press." >> on this tuesday overhead lines making news michael jackson's family is suing the entertainment company that sponsored the last tour. tmz reports that -- >> 2011? >> bill: come. come on. >> -- the new lawsuit they ar
the rate. we say, let's take some of that revenue to help reduce the deficit, combined with other targeted cuts. >> be more specific for me. when you talk about tax loopholes and the very wealthy. which specific loopholes and what is very wealthy? >> sure, sure, these are, when you're in the highest tax bracket, you're in the 39% tax bracket when you get a deduction, whatever it may be for, you get 39 cents worth of deduction. whereas somebody who is in the 28% tax bracket only gets 28 cents deduction for that particular deduction. so what we're saying and this is similar to a proposal the president's put forward, is that for folks who are in that very high bracket, the 39% bracket, the value of your deductions will be limited to about 28% which is what the value of deductions is for a middle income taxpayer. >> so ultimately, the budget that you have there and i just read the little chunk of it, you have more revenue increases than cuts, right? >> within, within this particular budget, but if you look, soledad, at the two-year period of reduction we've been engaged in, which is -- include
the foundation of our power. we need to do this. deficit reduction is a national security imperative that we need to be -- we need to be a lot smarter about how we go about it. is the notice we haven't had a budget since i became chairman of the joint chiefs and for some time before that. sequestration is quite simply the most a response to the way possible to manage the nation's defense. he is the antithesis. when a budget certainty, time and flexibility. sequestration compromises readiness and compounds risk. left unaddressed, it could lead to a security gap, lapse in coverage against the dresser and national security interest. it's also the law i'm hopeful but not all that optimistic that magnitude a mechanism will be defused in some future budget deal. in the meantime we have no choice which is of course our worst-case scenario. so are you feeling afflicted? if you are coming you're in good company. the coverage to continue my insurance metaphor may be a little less than what you're used to, but still the best available and it will get better in time. here's very hope that confidence brings c
a surplus of politics and deficit of intelligence when it comes to this. germans and fins and a number of others feel they have to tell very uninformed electorate that they are being tough. we have to extract some blood. they don't understand that this is a two pointed sword. by trying to extract blood from greeks sand cypriots they are inflicting enormous pain. $500 billion worth of capitalization around the world wiped out. >> as moronic as this plan was, we've heard there are not a lot of options. >> there are options. >> first of all, they should be putting in place the equivalent of the fdic. when we close a failed bank in the united states, we go in on a friday with fdic and occ. it's all hush hush. you close the bank. you move the depositors money into a good bank and you don't lose faith in the banking system. >> don't they need 27 countries to put that in their charter? >> this is what europe was moving toward. this is what was recognized this past summer and this is why -- >> we knew it would take time. >> this throws that out the window and the thing is that they're not sayi
to the president to prevent default. i have to tell you, wolf. we can't keep running up deficits like this. it will damage our economy deeply and people are saying that we don't have a crisis on the horizon. of course we do. we've got a debt that is on a tear right now. if the debt takes off like it's projected to do, it's not only hurting our economy today but destroying it for the next generation. we just can't sit around and be complicit with that. that means we have to do something about it. >> let me get your thoughts on a couple sensitive issues coming before congress. immigration reform. do you support a pathway to citizenship for the 11 or 12 million illegal immigrants in the united states? >> well, i think we can get the comprehensive immigration reform. i support reform. i supported the bush reforms in 2005 and 2006. i think we can find a way of making sure that people here with an undocumented status have an ability to adjust that status. we're not going to be able to deport 12 million people. and there is a way to do this without rewarding them for breaking the line or breaking
to approximately 5 billion euros. because then all your financing are the government deficits. >> adam, thank you so much. >> my pleasure. >> becky, you highlight a really good point. what is very clear from this government and also from the people on the ground that i've spoken with is they absolutely don't want to see a reduction in the sides of the banking system here because they know that is what 50% of the economy and a ton of the jobs, as well. they realize it's going to be a change of livelihood. changes that will happen in this country no matter what are going to be startling to the people here. >> i saw all the headlines coming from russia and the president here making strong comments. is that going to fall on deaf ears in europe? is that not a big deal as far as they're concerned? >> that would be my interpretation, absolutely. would you agree with that, adam? whatever russia says is going to fall on deaf ears when it comes to the troika? >> it doesn't fall on deaf ears. but the europeans have made a categoric statements. cypress has to come up with 5.8 billion euros. it can't be throu
that the information exists, but the lack of a communication ability to translate that is a significant deficit. for highly uncommon event such as an asteroid flyby, there simply no established mutation mechanism that i believe our flight operations team learned of da 14 when they received a courtesy call from a colleague at the aerospace corporation. last year the commercials of the industry participate in deities shriek for war games. these games are held every other year and they're designed to exercise dvd thinking about the deployment of the terrestrial and space aspects in response to a complex situation. last of those games included as they have several times in the past that dod relies on commercial satellite company, their reliance is considerable and that a crisis is the wrong time to establish clear lines accumulation which a major partners and suppliers. i suspect the same conclusion can be safely applied to the topics we're discussing today. while governments were first to since i want to near earth space, commercial enterprise will be the primary user of the orbital arc in the 21s
-point deficit to beat the cleveland cavaliers 98-95. they have now won 24 games in a row. >> bill: can you imagine being down 27. >> i mean that's -- in the third quarter being down that much is daunting. but it shows just how dominant lebron james is, when he is ready to turn it on, he turns it on, and there is no stopping him. which is different than he used to be. now he is a monster. >> bill: you have got it. we have a great lineup for you for the rest of the program, congress woman judy chu from southern california will be joining us as well as a friend of bill from the "huffington post" and joe, our own foreign policy guru who will bring us up to date on what the president is up to in the middle east and his syria in fact use chemical weapons as has been reported. and the republican party engaged in a sort of a civil war. we'll get into that, but first -- >> announcer: this is the "full court press." >> espn releasing president obama's complete march madness yesterday as the men's tournament gets underway today. number one louisville, indiana, ohio state, an
, thankfully. >>> facing a $1 billion deficit, chicago public school system is making some really big changes. ceo barbara byrd bennett says the district's underutilized skols will be closed. they have not said how many schools are expected to close but opponents say they unfairly target minorities. >>> 24 and counting for the miami heat. but it was not easy. it hasn't been easy the last few games. lebron james and company came back from 27 points down in the third. >> can you believe that? >> beat his old team, the cleveland cavaliers 98-95. a triple-double. 12 boards, 10 assists. the heat are now within nine games of the nba record for consecutive wins held by the '71-'72 los angeles lakers. >> do you think they'll do it? >> no. they almost blew it against the celtics, almost blew it against the cavs. they are the best team i've seen in years. i don't think they should ever lose necessarily but that's a lot of games to win in a row. >> i can't believe they were down that much and came back. >> i can't believe you can do that every night. >> i think they're doing it on purpose. >>> recovered
in the leadership, which is the deficit of trust between the two sides. but pulling back, they picture, wolf, many israeli critics of the president have said too often he lectures israelis and doesn't seem to understand israel. tonight those critics, man of them, are saying he now feels he has conveyed that he does understand israel in a deep personal way, wolf. >> jessica yellin traveling with the president in jerusalem getting ready to head over to jordan with him tomorrow. jessica, thanks. >>> we're getting new information about claims that syria has used chemical weapons. our pentagon correspondent, barbara starr, has the very early results of the u.s. investigation. what is this, barbara? what are we hearing? >> brianna, as you said, the u.s. intelligence community has been working on this problem around the clock. did the syrian regime use chemical weapons. we do now have some initial results of that investigation. with video of syrians suffering from convulsions and breathing problems, and accusations of chemical weapons attacks, u.s. intelligence agencies have scrambled to determine if the
deficit. we're spending a trillion more than we take in every year. everything has to be on the table. one thing i would suggest is that there are tipping points to everything. in the middle class segment people between $100,000 to $250,000 in home purchase price, mortgage interest makes sense to the middle class borrowers. and the question is do they count that when they look to buy a home versus rent. people stopping buying altogether. if it has an impact, how does that impact construction? has to be on the table. it has to be something we take in context with the broader picture. >> help us get rid of freddie and fannie some day too. put something together for me, will you? >> keep in mind, while we sit around and vilify freddie and fannie. >> see you love them. that's a shock. >> i don't. i think we ought to go away from them. but we need liquidity to ensure there's capital. >> can't do it now. especially now. all right. great hair. good looking man. and you watch, unlike some other people that work here. anyway, thanks, dave. >> you may not watch for a few minutes when you walk to get
for some tax revenue to help reduce the deficit, calls for some more stimulus, more spending that way. and we're in this funny process where today we will wrap up, i think a little beforehand technically, but we'll wrap up 50 hours of debate and then start the unlimited amendment process. basically, any issue you've ever heard your callers call in and complain about we might see votes on today. it could be stuff like drone strikes against u.s. citizens, and it could be taxes and repealing health care and all these different issues that may come up. the point to remember, though, is this is all adding on to a nonbinding budget resolution. so it's interesting, and it may give people clues as to what appetites there are in the senate to pass or repeal certain elements of policy. but it's not binding right away. >> host: headline in your publication, "the hill," says the senate is poised to pass a budget. do you expect this to pass, and what's the significance? where does it go from here? >> guest: we do expect it. i think the democrats will be able to control the process and get it passe
project 1 billion dollar deficit next year. the closures will save chicago $560 million the next decade. >> whether you do this, mike, in chamucla, florida, or chicago, illinois, this is always excruciating tough for parents and kids, but you got to do it if you're going to keep the budget. >> you have to do it to same some semblance of sanity for a big city like that but you get into where are the displaced kids going to go to schools when the schools are closed? are they going to be bussed? most parents would like their kids to go to a neighborhood school and what happens then? that a huge burden for the mayor now. >> totally. sequestration is complicating it even more. we just did a report that head start across the country is facing these exact challenges and cutting school days and not accepting kids and randomly dropping kids from the program and a disadvantage for kids in that economic status. >> you look at the regional and local papers across the country you see endless stories like this. you look at the national programs and turn on the tv news and where is the white house tou
, nor sleet senator snow nor deficit. no word this morning, saturday mail delivery is back on. >>> and 911 shocker. >> can you tell can you tell me by tapping on the phone once that do not open the door. >> 911, where is your image? >> the frightening moments and amazing end. live on the cnn newsroom. >>> good morning, thank you for joining us. i'm carol costello. three people dead at the marine base in quantico. the base is in lockdown, law enforcement surrounded the building. >> the shooter, an active duty marine, was pronounced dead of an apparent self-inflicted gunshot wound by law enforcement at the scene. two other victims, a male and female, both active duty marines, were pronounced dead at the scene. the three marines involved in this incident, all permanent personnel assigned to officer candidate school. all of the candidates in the school are accounted for and safe. >> the base is used mostly for training and it's known as crossroads of the marine corps. we will have a live report at the bottom hour. >>> also following a truly horrifying story from georgia's southern
should be used to tackle the deficit and invest in the middle class, not be used just to simply tax, cut tax rates for the rich the way that the house budget did. >> reporter: now the senate did not accept the paul ryan house budget. the patty murray budget, the senate plan will probably come up to a vote 2:00 a.m. or so. uma: 2:00 a.m. regardless how votes will go won't there be need for serious negotiations? >> reporter: no question about that the house has a very different version than the senate. the house said they would balance the budget without raising taxes. the senate is doing more spending, more taxes. so our colleague greta van susteren asked house budget chair paul ryan about next steps. >> house passed the budget. the senate is passing a budget first time we've seen that in four years. that's a good thing. the question is now can we start looking for common ground? can we started a advancing toward a compromise? the way we look at this as house republicans. we understand our budget probably won't become law in every great detail but hopefully we get a down payment on this p
is it doesn't really look like a whole lot. surely not enough to fill our deficit at this point but it is going to bring back the cooler temperatures in the overnight hours with the cloud cover. we will actually see our 0 overnight lows and our morning temperatures come up. low 40s in the forecast tuesday, wednesday, thursday. unsettled weather wednesday and thursday with a bigger storm moving in for the weekend. this second system, or third system i guess we could call it, could bring us scattered showers for saturday and sunday. >>> on tuesday night the sacramento city counsel will consider throwing up a last- second shot to keep the kings from leaving town. the city has struck a daily to build a new $448 million downtown arena, and it would be the largest redevelopment project in sacramento history with up to a million and a half square feet of offices housing shops and a hotel. the city would pay $258 million with most of the money coming from the sale of bonds supported by parking revenues. >> that's part of revitalizing our downtown. that's part of completing the rest of k
spending but leaves the government with $566 billion in annual deficits over the next ten years. the house plan balances the budget by 2023 with big cuts in domestic spending and major changes to medicare and the tax code. charlie rangel, new york's most famous congressman, is here with me. former chair of the house ways and means committee. start with the chasm between the two plans. is there room for compromise at all between the senate and house plan? >> the major difference is that, obama and most of the country that voted for him really thinks that a time of recession that we're coming out of it that we should be creating jobs and not laying off people just with cuts. that is the difference. the major difference between the senate and the house. republicans say no taxes, no money, no investment. well, that's absolutely ridiculous. in order to get people back to work and having disposable income, you've got to invest in education, the infrastructure, the bridges and the tunnels. there's no money in the republican, because they say that we're taking care of revenues. where the heck that
. they will take middle-class money. they will take everybody's money in order to pay off the deficit. it's something you have to think about. >> brian: there was a report from somebody in great britain, an authority of some sort who was talking about, given what has happened in sigh plus, if i had money in spain i would get it out. >> no, it's being talked about in other places. in worse of terms of condition, spain is a good one, greece and lots of other places and they are talking about it. you know, at some point maybe they start talking here. what ultimately that means is that jobs will -- you think we have bad unemployment now. you will see unemployment like you've never seen it before. >> gretchen: somebody from your show, celebrity apprentice, a lot of people will be shocked they didn't see it. amarosa and claudia got the hook >> why didn't she bring amarosa back? in all fairness claudia, i have to defend you. if she was brought back it wouldn't matter. you were the project manager and you failed. you have a great future. i'm sorry -- you're fired! >> did you for a second i can't
if rates were liar. they had the time because rates were so much lower and deficit was going up slower. in a real sense the fed buying the treasuries has made it less painful for the government. >> i'm not sure if the population that chairs the euro or those that chair somewhat with central planning with regard to the 27 countries, but my question to you is i'm not sure we're going to lose any of these countries, but on the other hand, keeping their funding and the central bankers and the banks and insolvency all in line is a full -time job. is anybody worried about how we're growing these economies? is that the rally big elephant in the room? >> the growth hasn't phone zone up. we talked about it many times. what is the eventual exit strategy? our fed can't decide when to stop buying treasuries much less strengthen the balance sheet. >> i talked to jim bianco about the taper. this is another arena where the fed is going to paint themselves into a corner, they're going to move them up and down with every data point? in the end, they just have to say enough is enough, don't they? >> goi
for this in more ways than one. you think about the deficit, the government doesn't have this kind of cash and people are concerned this isn't necessarily the best use of taxpayer money. in the video, you saw a second ago, people are dressed up as crew members on a starship enterprise, and the government employee version of characters claiming they will boldly go where no government employees have ever gone before. it is funny. but i watched the videos with my producer and we were trying to to figure out the training value and people have similar questions. >> i have been since corrected and am about to burst into a fit of giggles and i inappropriately said it is "gilligan's island," not whatever i said. what is the irs saying about this in. >> they came up with this statement saying it is -- i'm quoting now, no mistaking this video does not reflect the best stewardship of resources, and that video of this type will not be made today. so the irs does say training gener videos in general are cheaper. that would involve some travel. >> okay. zain asher, thank you. >>> honeymoons, they are th
the deficit while 38% said, spending should be increased to boost job creation. tracy: hmmm. how about that? all right, joining us with more on this bill passed today that peter barnes was just referencing too and americans feeling on the economy, congressman marsha blackburn. thanks for being with us today. start with the continuing resolution. here we go again, kicking the can down the road, buying some time. we'll be back to square one in a couple months. then what? >> i'll tell you at least what we have is a continuing resolution that recognizes the reductions that were made, the spending reductions that were made through sequestration. so that is, that's a good, a good solid step. with the budget, we have passed ours in the house. it will be the first time in several years for the senate to actually pass a budget. i guess they want their paychecks next month. and then, you know, tracy, let's see what comes forward as we try to working is out. they continue to say balanced approach but i'll tell you, i think the american people, there in your fox poll are exactly right. you have to get
. here is the next question. is reducing the federal deficit a worthy goal in and of itself? and 85% say yes. 11% say no. it's not just john boehner who said it's not an immediate problem. paul ryan, the face of fiscal responsibility himself this past weekend on one of the sunday shows said not an immediate problem. so americans have gotten the message that it is a problem and that we should be tackling it right now, even though our lawmakers feel it can be down the road a year, five years, whatever we tackle it. >> brian: our next guest has nothing to at to this subject. so i'll move on. >> steve: he does. he's going to -- >> brian: he's coming out of his chair. solar companies were supposed to boost our economy. now evidence they might be tanking our economy. you remember solyndra that cost american taxpayers more than $500 million. turns out it may have a successor. >> steve: months after opening, the oregon based solar panel company, solo power, is facing layoffs, putting 250 million of our taxpayer dollars in jeopardy. apparently stuart varney, we learned nothing from solyndra. >> n
. that's how many chicago schools will be closed because a $1 billion budget deficit. it's not clear how many teachers are lose their jobs, but they will close a bunch of schools. 43,000. that's how many jobs have been lost since j.c. penney -- at j.c. penney since ron johnson became ceo. a new report shows he let the company pay for at least nine executives to get work by two jets, which cost $41 million apiece. nice work if you can get it. mr. kilmeade? >> brian: or if you had it. it's one of the most outrageous stories of the week. one of the most popular pharmacies telling their employees to step on the scale or pay a penalty. cvs wants employees to report their weight, fat and glucose levels to health insurance bosses and if they don't, they get fined $600 a year. it might be legal, but is it fair? steven mitchell is an employment attorney and author of a book, "the employee rights handbook." and john is a professor at a law school. does this sound right to you? >> it's an outrage n my opinion. they're trying to help people's health, but when you impose a penalty on people, that's w
to close the 54 schools in an effort to make a dent in a $1 billion budget deficit, make better use of resources and improve overall education here in the nation's third largest school district. >> i don't think it's going to be good for my kids. >> reporter: the news of the school closings continues to ripple across chicago this morning. >> i'm, just don't know where they're going to go. >> reporter: mayor rahm emmanuel says the closures are necessary after too much money was being spent on maintaining underutilized school buildings saying "by consolidating these schools, chicago public schools can focus on safely getting every child into a better performing school. like school systems in new york and philadelphia, where schools are being closed, chicago must make tough choices." a number of teachers may lose their jobs as a result of the closings. karen lewis. of the teachers' union lashed out at emmanuel. >> our mayor, who is away on a ski trip, drops this information right before spring break. it's the ultimate bullying job. mayor rahm emmanuel should be ashamed of himself. >> r
of a communication ability to translate that is a significant deficit. for highly uncommon events such as an asteroid fly-by, there's simply no established communication mechanism. i believe our flight operations team learned of da-14 when they received a courtesy call from a colleague at the aerospace corporation. last year the commercial satellite industry participated in dod's war games designed to exercise dod thinking about the deployment of its terrestrial and space assets in response to a conflict situation. last year those games concluded, as they have several times in the past, that dod relies on commercial satellite companies -- their reliance is considerable and that a crisis is the wrong time to try to establish clear lines of communication with your major partners and suppliers. i suspect the same conclusion can be safely applied to the topics that we're discussing today. while governments were first to send satellites to near-earth space, commercial enterprise will be the primary use of the orbital arc in the 21st century. government and space operators need to take a more collaborative
. hagan: thank you, mr. president. this amendment establishes a deficit -- the presiding officer: the senate will be in order. mrs. hagan: mr. president? the presiding officer: the senator from north carolina. mrs. hagan: this amendment establishes a deficit-neutral reserve fund for families of service members and veterans. my home state has the third largest military footprint in the nation. one out of every three people is in the military, a veteran or related to a service member or veteran, and we are proud that we make military families welcome in north carolina because supporting military families is one of the best ways that we can support our troops. this amendment is deficit neutral. it will not add one penny to our deficit. it helps to create room in the budget for legislation to help military families in areas ranging from health care to housing and from education to job placement while their loved ones are serving our country away from home. a vote for this amendment is a vote for our military families, for the sons, daughters, husbands, wives and families who sacrific
of the well. mrs. shaheen: amendment 438 would establish a deficit neutral reserve fund fupped to protect women's access to health care, including family planning and birth control. it ensures employers cannot deny coverage of contraceptives. we've seen that improving access to preventive care including con troo tra ception is good health -- contraception is good health policy and good economic policy. healthier women and healthier children and healthier families. i urge my colleagues to support the amendment. the presiding officer: the senator is recognized. a senator: every senator supports expanding access to health care. we may have differences on how to it but no one should doubt that commitment. however, we must also ensure we protect deeply held religious beliefs of our citizens. in this regard, the shaheen amendment and the new health care law gets it all wrong. mr. johanns: in addition to growing government and slowing the economy, the law tramples on the rights of individuals. later this afternoon senator fischer will offer a side-by-side to this amendment. now i ask my colleagu
that it is the entitlement program -- social security and medicare, the primary drivers of our debt and deficit. this is a simple amendment. it says it establishes a budget point of order that any budget resolution that is brought forward that does not count or does not prepare a 75 year solvency for social security and medicare would be out of order. in the next 20 years we'll be paying out $5.1 trillion in benefits in excess of what we are bringing in in terms of dedicated revenue to the payroll tax. the unfunded liability of social security is $20.5 trillion. for medicare the unfunded liability is $42.8 trillion. these programs must be reformed so they are saved for future generations. again, i would hope everybody would support -- the presiding officer: the senator's time has expired. mr. johnson: -- any budget that does not have 57 year solvency. the presiding officer: the senator from washington. mrs. murray: social security and medicaid played a critical role in providing a foundation of financial security and health care for hundreds of millions of americans over the decades. democrats
federal debt and deficit. i understand his dedication. but i oppose this amendment, madam president, over the last several years we have enacted $1.8 trillion in spending cuts on a bipartisan basis, so we don't have any trouble cutting spending in this body right now. where we do seem to have trouble is locking in the revenue necessary to achieve a balanced deficit reduction. and i recommend that our colleagues oppose this amendment and i ask for the yeas and nays. the presiding officer: there appears to be. the clerk will call the roll. vote: a vote: 6 vote: vote: the presiding officer: are there any senators in the chamber wishing to vote or change their vote? if not, the ayes are 47, the nays 52. the amendment is not agreed to. mrs. murray: i move to reconsider. the presiding officer: the senator from washington. a senator: lay that on the able to. the presiding officer: without objection. mrs. murray: i ask that you can the following package of amendments, 17 democratic and 13 republican amendments, be considered and agreed to en bloc. shaheen 1149, blumeen that will man chain 316, wy
of the problem, we need to be in this deficit, secondly, the assumption that there won't be any cost of doing business increases, it costs around 20%. years of double digit health care costs, no raises, the city keeps paying lip service to this issue you tell us we're important, let's do something about it in good faith, let's have the conversation and not shut the door. >> any members of the public who wish to comment on item number 1? okay, seeing none, public comment is closed. colleagues, at this point, i would like to make a motion to continue this item to the call of the chair. >> second. >> okay, second, we can do that without opposition. so moved. >> mr. clerk, can you please call item number 2. >> item number 2 is a hearing of city's reserve and set aside policy for
of all of our problems that were caused because of the sequester and still do deficit reduction, get our budget toward balance. and if that happens, this sequester will end. not only for the f.a.a. my friend is right. this is ridiculous. but for the 70,000 children who are being cut out of head start. why isn't there more discussion about that? when we know every dollar invested in a child, in head start, saves $10 because they get that head start in life. and where's the outrage of the h.i.v. -- 421,000 fewer h.i.v. tests? that's a public health emergency when 421,000 people can't get their h.i.v. tests, they don't know if they're h.i.v. positive. they could spread the virus. that's what's happening with this sequester. 10,500 lost teacher jobs. 2,700 will lose title 1 funds. that's a million kids who are getting special reading help because of this sequester. i think we all agree, the sequester is no way to govern. we can get to pay balanced budget without a sequester. we did that under bill clinton. we had a balanced approach. we made investments in our people. we cut out unnecessary
of the problem that we're in as a country in terms of our debt and deficits, we have to have programs that have metrics on them, they have to be followed up, the grants have to be followed, and they need to be held to account. so i hope my colleagues -- i have no hopes of this passing, because most of the colleagues won't actually look at the research that's been done on this, won't look at the effectiveness of it, won't look at the waste, and they'll vote a party-line vote to defeat this amendment. we'll get 45 or 50 votes or 51 or 52. but it'll go down and so consequently real problems that have been oversighted by the permanent subcommittee on investigation, really oversighted by the department of homeland security, the real solutions to problems won't happen because of the way this place is being run. i'd next like to talk about amendment 93. amendment 93 follows a recommendation of the president -- not my recommend day, the president's recommendation. and what this amendment would do is actually take money that has been directed for expired heritage area authorizations that weren't any rec
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